Z’s 2017 Reading Challenge
52 books – one book a week 

Dec:

Nov:
Rejection Proof by Jia Jiang Goodbye, Things by Fumio Sasaki Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert business-model-generation

Oct:
Community by Peter Block 6 Months to 6 Figures by Peter Voogd The Goal by Eliyahu M. Goldratt 41mq7ss7lpl-_sy445_ql70_

Sep:
Boundaries by Henry Cloud The Industries of the Future by Alec J. Ross Zero to One by Peter Thiel Originals by Adam M. Grant

Aug:
Stand Out by Dorie Clark The Lean Startup by Eric Ries The Power of Broke by Daymond John The Happiness Hypothesis by Jonathan Haidt

Jul:
The Inner Game of Tennis by W. Timothy Gallwey   

Jun:
The 4-Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss The Magic of Thinking Big by David J. Schwartz How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen Influence by Robert B. Cialdini

May:
Grit by Angela Duckworth Be Obsessed or Be Average by Grant Cardone  

Apr:
Mindset by Carol S. Dweck Winning by Jack Welch  The Practicing Mind by Thomas M. Sterner

Mar:
   

Feb:
   

Jan:
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Z-ONE-THING Takeaway

For each of the books above, if there is only ONE THING I learned, it is:
(+ how I ranked it on Goodreads)

March:

  1. Sleep Smarter: 21 Essential Strategies to Sleep Your Way to A Better Body, Better Health, and Bigger Success by Shawn Stevenson (4/5)
    • “High quality sleep fortifies your immune system, balances your hormones, boosts your metabolism, increases physical energy, and improves the function of your brain.” (Check out a great summary by WeZBest)
  2. The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins (4/5)
    • “One way for genes to solve the problem of making predictions in rather unpredictable environments is to build in a capacity for learning… Survival machines that can simulate the future are one jump ahead of survival machines who can only learn on the basis of overt trial and error. The trouble with overt trial is that it takes time and energy. The trouble with overt error is that it is often fatal. Simulation is both safer and faster. The evolution of the capacity to simulate seems to have culminated in subjective consciousness.” (Check out a great summary by WeZBest.)
  3. Crush It!: Why Now Is the Time to Cash In on Your Passion by Gary Vaynerchuk (4/5)
    • “True success—financial, personal, and professional—lies above all in loving your family, working hard, and living your passion.” (Check out a great summery by PaulMinor) [This book inspired me to create & run this website.]
  4. Shoe Dog by Phil Knight (5/5)

February:

  1. Being Mortal: Illness, Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande (5/5)
  2. The Little Book on Common Sense Investing by John “Jack” Bogle (5/5)
  3. The Dictator’s Handbook: Why Bad Behavior is Almost Always Good Politics by Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and Alastair Smith (5/5)
    • “After all, even if politics is nothing more than a game that leaders play, if only we learn the rules, it becomes a game we can win… To improve the world, however, all of us must first suspend faith in conventional wisdom. Let logic and evidence be the guide and our eyes will be opened to the reasons why politics works the way it does. Knowing how and why things are as they are is a first, crucial step toward learning how to make them better.” (Check out a great summary by WeZBest)
  4. The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life by Alice Schroeder (5/5)
    • “Since childhood, he had read every biography he could find of people he admired, looking for the lessons he could learn from their lives. He attached himself to everyone who could help him and coattailed anyone he could find who was smart. He ruled out paying attention to almost anything but business—art, literature, science, travel, architecture—so that he could focus on his passion. He defined a circle of competence to avoid making mistakes.” (Check out a great summary by WeZBest)

January:

  1. The 10X Rule: The Only Difference Between Success and Failure by Grant Cardone (4/5)
    • “Assume that every project you attempt will take more time, money, energy, effort, and people than you can imagine. Multiply every expectation by 10, and you will probably be safe. And if doesn’t take 10 times more than anticipated, great. It is better to be pleasantly surprised than greatly disappointed.” (Check out a great summary by SmartExperiments)
  2. Managing Oneself by Peter F. Drucker (5/5)
    • “Successful careers are not planned, successful careers are developed when people prepare for opportunities because they know their strengths, method of work and values.” (Check out a great summary by Medium)
  3. Get Smart!: How to Think, Decide, Act, and Get Better Results in Everything You Do by Brian Tracy (4/5)
    • “Resolve today to develop long-time perspective. Become intensely future oriented. Think about the future most of the time. Consider the consequences of your decisions and actions. What is likely to happen? And then what could happen? And then what? Practice self-discipline, self-mastery, and self-control. Be willing to pay the price today in order to enjoy the rewards of a better future tomorrow.” (Check out a great summary by Farnam Street)
  4. The Talent Code: Greatness Isn’t Born. It’s Grown. Here’s How. by Daniel Coyle (5/5)
    • “Struggle is not optional – it’s neurologically required: in order to get your skill circuit to fire optimally, you must by definition fire the circuit sub-optimally; you must make mistakes and pay attention to those mistakes; you must slowly teach your circuit. You must also keep firing that circuit – ie, practicing – in order to keep myelin functioning properly. After all, myelin is living tissue.” (Check out a great summary by WeZBest)